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Somebody to run the day-to-day so I can go look for the next big growth opportunity? And they like the day-to-day? They’re naturally gifted at it? And they can listen to my daily 20 ideas (before breakfast!) and go execute the best one?

Sounds like a unicorn! Where do I find this mythical beast, outside an enchanted forest?

Answer: On this recording of our June 26 Zoominar, “Hire the Right Integrator at the Right Time.”

Business owners who read about Integrators in Rocket Fuel by Gino Wickman and Mark Winters can be forgiven for falling in love (lust?) with the Integrator. They truly sound like magic to Visionary company founders. And, they prompt questions:

* How much do Integrators make?
* How do I know when I’m ready for a full-time Integrator?
* What value can an Interim/Fractional Integrator provide for companies building up to a full-time Integrator?

Our guests are the Visionary and Integrator from the executive search firm that found EOS Worldwide’s Integrator. They’ve got data and experience to answer the above questions.

Zoominar Recording

Zoominar Transcript

Note: Automatically transcribed using otter.ai. You will almost certainly find some entertaining transcription errors. They are our gift to you.

John Fulwider  

Good morning all it is am and it is time to begin our zoom in our today how to hire the right integrator at the right time with Mike Froman, and Tony Bednar from Keystone search. Let me share my screen here and we’ll review a couple of slides as we start our time together this morning. I am John Fulwider. I’m an EOS implementer, which means that I help visionaries and their leadership teams grow their businesses faster than they ever thought possible. I teach a system called EOS that aligns your people and optimizes your processes. So ultimately, you can make more profit. The topic that we’re talking about here today is part of EOS visionaries and integrators. The man who wrote the book traction, Gino wickman. On which EOS is based, he made a big contribution to business growth by noting that it takes two great entrepreneurs at the top of an organization to really grow and scale a business. Those two are the visionary and the integrator. And today, we’re going to learn a lot about the integrator side of that business partnership. To put this all in context, for those of you on the call, who aren’t familiar with EOS EOS stands for the entrepreneurial operating system. And what EOS does is say that man, as a business owner, as a business leader, growing your business in the trenches every day, and there’s just 136 things flying at you every day from up, left down, forwards, backwards and diagonal. Oh, my gosh, there’s wastebasket fires right outside your Office Store. dumpster fires in the parking lot smoke gets in your eyes. He can’t see the forest for the trees. Gosh, it’s just wild and wacky working in the day to day of a business. And so what EOS says is that to the extent you will focus on strengthening just six key components of your business. Oh my gosh, it just tends to calm everything down and let you get a grip on your business. So you’re running it rather than it’s running you. So if you care to learn a little bit more stick around after Mike and Tony are done presenting. And I’ll give a really brief tour of the EOS model that you see here. Toward the end of our time together. Pull out your calendars if you would really quickly please and mark your calendars for two upcoming zoom in ours. One is two weeks from today on July 10, same time at 8am. My friend Gina trimarco is good going to be telling us how to improv eyes your business. So Gina is an amazingly talented and funny woman. She is a second city trained improv comedian who teaches business communication and scale sales skill improvement through the use of improv comedy skills. I’ve been through a number of her in person and virtual workshops, I learned something new and become a better communicator. Every time I’m in the room virtually, or in person with Gina, I’m confident you’ll have the same results. So be sure to register for that. That’s July 10 at a pm Next up is me. Get a grip on your business with me John Fulwider your EOS implementer. That’s on July 24. So if after the quick tour, I give you the EOS model and I show you how you can align your people optimize your process and increase your profit. I’ll show you that briefly here at the end of our zoom and or the July 24 zoom in our will be an in depth look at how you can use EOS to grow your business. And that’s an opportunity to ask questions about how it applies to your specific business. So Mark your calendars for July 24. With that, look for three emails coming to you after this zoom in our number one will be a focus Friday email coming next Friday with registration links for Gina zoom and our and my seminar. The second one will be a recording transcript and slide deck from today’s zoom and our that’ll come you know Saturday or Monday or so and then finally look for a quick connection email from our guests Mike and Tom Tony with a special gift for you. It’s an E book titled How to hire the right Integrator for you. That is a deep dive into the methods of doing the search for the integrator. All right, with that, let me introduce Mike and Tony. So why are we here, right? We’re here because of this idea of this integrator, somebody and here I’m talking to business owners, right visionaries. Somebody to run the day to day so that I can go look for the next big growth opportunity. And they like the day today. They’re naturally gifted at it, and they can listen to my daily 20 ideas before breakfast, and go execute the best one. The sounds like a unicorn right? Where do I find this mythical beast outside of an enchanted forest? business owners like you who read about integrators in rocket fuel by Gino wickman, and Mark winter Man, you can be forgiven for falling in love, maybe in lust with the integrator because they truly sound like magic to visionary company owners and company founders and reading about them prompts questions like, how much do integrators make? How do I know when I’m ready for a full time integrator, what value could an interim or fractional integrator provide for companies that are building up to a full time integrator? So our guest today Mike and Tony are the visionary and integrator from the executive search firm that found the integrator for eo s worldwide, the company have created the concept of integrator, so, they’ve got the data. They’ve got the experience to answer all of your great questions about integrators. Speaking of questions, start typing your questions right now, in the q&a box. Down in your zoom toolbar, you’ll see a button called QA In a tap on that to start typing your questions, right now, Tony and Mike can go a whole bunch of different directions with this presentation. Let’s customize it for your needs. Right from the start, please type your questions, and I will ask them of Mike and Tony. So with that, it’s gonna feel good. Let’s actually audibly clap for Mike and Tony to welcome them to focus Friday.

Tony Bednar  

Thank you, john. We appreciate it. And thanks for inviting us to join you today. We’re excited to be here and deliver some of this content that we have for the audience. So my name is Tony Bender, I’m the president integrator here at Keystone executive search. I’m also the EOS practice leader. Just a couple of quick highlights about Keystone. We’ve been around since 2002. We’ve been running on EOS ourselves since 2009. We from a from a US perspective, we do integrator search visionary search, leadership team search. So we do have the highest levels within organizations is what we specialize in from a search perspective. And then we also recently launched a new service called an integrator evaluation. And we can get into that more in early in the q&a session. up today’s time together, we are excited to introduce many of you to what we’ve developed in call the integrator continual. So it’s a tool that you can use to help make sure you’re putting the right person in that integrator seat for your business, somebody that really matches the needs of your business. So that’ll be a big part of what we covered today. During the presentation and with me, I’ve got Mike from elte, our CEO and visionary. It’s hard to tell by looking at him but but Mike’s been doing executive search for close to 30 years so he is the industry veteran. And my coach and mentor and then in you know, he’s what makes this company company tick. So glad to have Mike with us today as well. So our goal today is basically to share what we’ve learned over the past 10 plus years do an integrator search. We want to make you you know, comfortable making that hiring decision. So we’re going to share some things that we’ve learned to hopefully, you know, take you down that path and answer some of the following questions. You know, is my company ready for an integrator? What is my integrator look like? What are what are my options for filling that integrator seat? We’ll talk about some common mistakes and lessons learned. And then obviously, we’ll we’ll have a lot of time for q&a, which is where you’ll derive a ton of value from our time together this morning.

John Fulwider  

And Tony some questions have already come in. So put these on your tick list. One is about integrator compensation. So how do you figure out how to compensate integrator size of business number of employees, what’s the average salary total compensation for an integrator. And I know that’s one that you were already planning on covering and you’ve got data on that. Dan asks, How does one identify the exact needs of the visionary write down all the things we don’t like doing? smiley face. And then Joel asks another question, can you talk about bringing a fractional integrator in which I know that you had planned to do and what about an integrator with another company spending part time on your company perfect.

Tony Bednar  

So what we’re going to do is I’m going to turn it over to Mike and he’s gonna kind of tee things off by taking you through his visionary integrator journey from when he started his business up until bringing on his his first integrator. So Mike, I’ll turn it over to you.

Terrific. I apologize. I’m not seeing the your screen Tony. Oh,

Mike Frommelt  

Sharing.

Tony Bednar  

JOHN, are we sharing?

John Fulwider  

You have not clicked share on your slide deck yet?

Tony Bednar  

Perfect. Let me just go ahead and do that.

Mike Frommelt  

It’s putting the pressure on me to present without without a PowerPoint this morning. There we go. Here we go. keep me going. I see in your screen. There we go.

Here you go. Terrific. Thank you much better. All right. Well, welcome everyone. Thank you for being here this morning. And welcome. Welcome to my basement here in Minneapolis. So appreciate you being here this morning. with us. Just to kind of set the table I’m going to talk a little bit about the the visionary or entrepreneurial journey and I’ll share some of my own experiences along the way here as well. But you know, all of us are on that on a journey. All of us entrepreneurs are on a journey that actually doesn’t start when we start the business. It actually started Before that, when we have that, that dream or that idea, you know, maybe you have a better idea for a product or a service. Or maybe you’re like me, and you just think you’re somehow smarter than your boss and you can do it better. So you jump out on your own and you start that business. And you think about it for a while. Usually, some people think about it for years. But eventually you take that that leap and you jump into business. And then you get all these cool titles that come with it. You know, now you’re an entrepreneur, you’re a founder, you’re an owner, all those great things your college calls you and says, Can you come in and speak to students and it’s really exciting at that at that stage of the game. But what really is going on at least for me behind the scenes is you know, you’re you’re learning a lot of hard lessons and you’re struggling and trying to get going and try to establish something and you know, for me, one of the the real early lessons that I learned was around revenue and profit and income. I was working for a another search firm here in Minneapolis and and it was, I started the company started Keystone In an early 2002, so if you remember it was right after two, right after 911. And I was working as 100% commission recruiter at that point in time and that right after 911, the economy was terrible. And I was making nothing. And I thought, Hey, this is my opportunity, right? I’m gonna jump out do it on my own. Now, how much worse can I do? But that first lesson that I learned was that once you own the company, you can make less than zero. So you learn things along the way, right. But eventually, we made it through I had a partner at that point in time and we made it through, you know, getting some clients and starting to establish some business, the economy started coming back and we started to get a little bit established. We went into that expansion phase, we’re now we started to hire a few people in the organization. But really, everything kind of still came through me it was, you know, the people that we hired, I was handing things off to them as I could, but there really wasn’t any accountability for them, other than what I handed to them. them and they were good people but but everything still came through me and I got frustrated and, and was working really hard and not feeling like I was making any progress and, and that about that time is when EOS came along. And so, early in 2010 we started to work with with Mike Payton from us. If we move forward, Tony, on the on the slides, please. Thank you. So we started to work with with the EOS and do an EOS implementation. They said we work with Mike Peyton in those days. And, you know, Mike brought in these crazy ideas, the idea that you know, you should actually have an accountability chart and these people who work for you, you should have a list of things that they need to do and you should hold them accountable to that. And you should be working in the areas that you’re best at and you should have some goals and you should have a veto and write these things down and make sure you know where you’re going. You know, it’s all was all kind of new stuff for me basic kind of stuff, but it was you know, an eye opener for me and got us really going in the in the right direction. But even then, at that point in time, we didn’t, we didn’t hire an integrator. I was certainly in the visionary chair. I didn’t bring in an integrator right away and spent a few years with that seat open. And it wasn’t really until about three and a half to four years ago that I brought in the first integrator to Keystone. And that was a fractional integrator that I brought in two days a week. And his name was Jerry, he really helped me in terms of making sure that we got our organizational structure, right, and our practice lines, right, and the right people in the right seats and really started to establish the business and honestly, it wasn’t until I brought in that fractional integrator that I really felt like you know, this business is going to be sustainable that this is going to go on and I can kind of start to step back a little bit and be in that truly be in that visionary role and be an owner of the company and not be so tied up in the day to day of the business. And then a year ago, Tony came on with us. Is our full time integrator. So we’ve been through a progression of bringing in, you know, going from no one in that seat to fractional to, to a full time person in that seat and and we’re getting to that spot where you know where that we can really create that rocket fuel in the business now.

So for those of you today what we’re going to talk about Tony is going to handle most of the presentation here today. But what we’re going to talk about is, you know, at that toward the end of this, this journey, this journey and slide here, really that space between coming in and doing EOS and starting to get going with EOS and then really creating that, taking it to that next level to really create that rocket fuel. Maybe you’ve not hired not you’re like me, you had to have an open seat in that integrator role today. You’ve been holding that open for whatever reason, maybe you’ve hired that integrator and it hasn’t worked out or maybe you’re not sure if it’s going to work out. But this is really where we’re gonna focus today and talk about how you move from getting established to really create that rocket fuel scenario.

Tony Bednar  

Awesome. Thanks, Mike. So I’m gonna take it back and we’re gonna, you know, talk more about the integrator role. And what is this mystical creature that john, you know, referred to as a unicorn unicorn earlier. So, lots of different descriptions of this role. And if you haven’t read the book rocket fuel rocket fuel yet, you should pick it up and read it. You know, Mike would say it’s one of the best books ever written. And it’s not just because he’s quoted on page 121 of the hardcover and 139 of the paperback. But in all seriousness, it does a really good job of defining, you know, the visionary and the integrator roles. I think chapter one is dedicated to the visionary, you know, who are they What do they look like? What do they bring to the business? chapter two is dedicated to the integrator, you know, answering the same questions and when you get into chapter two, there’s this long list of things that This integrator role does, um, you know, and some of them are more tactical, others are more strategic. You know, you look at the project management, the execution, you know, and then you get up into the more strategic things, the problem solver, the conceptional, thinker, you know, forward thinking and things. So, you know, some hot out there in terms of this integrator role, ultimately leading up to, you know, what Gino describes as the visionary Prozac. So when you get to the to, you know, you find that right person, you know, the benefits that they can bring to you as the visionary and ultimately to your business. So we’re going to talk a lot today about this role. Well, we’ve, we’ve determined through our experiences, kind of the different levels of the integrator role, which is how we, you know, came up with this integrator continuum that’s on your screen right now. So what we did was we took that long list within rocket fuel when we we packaged it up and put it into these cabinets. And then put them on this continuum in an order for, you know, ultimately businesses and visionaries to be able to do two things, plot where they’re at from a business perspective and what their specific needs are. And then ultimately, when we’re out there evaluating integrators, we can evaluate them against this continuum, and help visionaries understand at what level and help integrators understand what level they’re playing at, in terms of what their skill sets and experiences and background can bring to an organization. So we’re going to take some time. And we’re going to walk through this this continuum in some detail here. So on the lower end, we have managed ppm and what that stands for, is manage people, process and metrics and then monitor the progress of those metrics. So one thing we want to point out right up front and just because this is the low end of the continuum, doesn’t mean this is a low level individual. This is An accomplished, competent, experienced person with you know, with significant experience and ability. This is someone that’s going to lead your leadership team, right? So they need to be at a certain level and have those experiences along with them. So we talked about people management, it’s just that, you know, it’s leaving the management team. You know, they’re managing your scorecard. They’re making sure you’re hitting your numbers, they’re, you know, they’re making sure people are being held accountable. So that’s really what the low end of that continuum consists of. Now, as you move to the right, the next section is people development. So this is, you know, people that have our skill that coaching, mentoring, developing people, really helping to build that overall management team and developing people at all levels of the organization. So that’s what they bring to the table. As we move further to the right, we’ve got the organizational development. So So again, when you if you hire an implementer, which we do highly recommend everybody, seriously consider doing that, to take you through kind of the process and teach you how to properly you know, implement the tools and things. One of the first things they’re going to do in your vision building days is have you complete your accountability chart and really start to focus in on, you know, the right people in the right seats within your organization. So in the middle of the continuum, these people, you know, have the ability to really help you build out that organizational chart, not just how it exists today. But as you are growing, you know, what seats do need to add, when do you need to add them, how to prioritize in terms of building your organization and continuing to grow. And then if we continue to move or look down below in terms of project management is also a really key skill set that the integrator role needs to bring at the lower end of the continuum. We expect these engines To be able to handle smaller functional projects, maybe within a, you know, one functional area, a great example would be, you know, a project within accounting, maybe it’s an accounts payable project might involve a few people, it’s two weeks, maybe a couple months long. But but pretty defined towards the higher end of the continuum, that’s when we start to get into enterprise wide mission critical projects. Maybe it’s a new MBRP implementation, it involves multiple departments, it’s complex, it’s it’s maybe nine months to a year in length, and it’s, you know, it’s really expensive. And if you do it wrong, it can be, you know, a dramatic impact on the business. So, those those higher level projects, we would expect the higher end of the continuum integrator to be able to do well. And then moving to the right, again, we’ve got the business planning. So this is where we really differentiate integrators from from kind of one level to the next and it’s these next two sections on the continuum. Really bump up in price as well. And we’ll get more into that into the compensation piece as we move in to the further slides. But from a business planning standpoint, you know, strategy development, somebody that’s out there and monitoring, understanding market trends, somebody that’s got abilities and experience with with product development, as well. So they’re looking at your service offerings, understanding when they need to evolve, when you’ve got a new offering, you should take to market those types of things. They bring all that to the table. And then ultimately, you know, it’s that advisor type roles, what’s that thought partner, and this is when, you know, you get that that visionary Prozac, so it’s someone that can stand toe to toe with the visionary, they’re at the same level, they can look, I I it’s, um, you’re, like I said, Your true thought partner. someone that you know, you can challenge each other. It’s it could be somebody from the outside that comes in and has more experience in certain areas than you. So they’re really adding that tremendous value to the organization. So we were looking at the, you know, lower end of the continuum, you know, who is that? What does that look like for companies and typically from our experience, it’s going to be companies in that one to $5 million annual revenue range. You know, it’s small to mid size professional services company, which you know, could be accounting, a law firm IT consulting, you know, your org chart might look like what we have represented here. So you’re smaller, you’ve got one of the three, you know, primary functional areas that’s starting to get built out a little bit, you know, if this were a dental office, you got the visionary who’s the owner, the dentist, who’s the owner and the visionary and you’ve got some hygienists, maybe that make up kind of an operational group. You might have, you might outsource finance and accounting and you might have a part time, you know, sales marketing resource. So in this example, you know, you’re looking for somebody that’s really Solid in terms of being able to manage your people processing your metrics that can do some of those people development skills, but that’s probably the level that would work best for the size of organization or the type of organization. Now, in Midwest, you know, dollars, what we found is, you know, from a compensation standpoint, this could look like, you know, 80 to $120,000 base salary. Plus bonus. So if you’re, you know, in New York, if you’re in LA, you know, you could probably add 20 to 25%. To this if you’re in a smaller market, second tier, third tier, you could maybe knock off you know, 10 15%, but as a ballpark range. This is this is what you would should expect to pay for somebody at this level. As we move up the continuum, and we kind of get into that organizational development section. You know, as your business grows, the complexity grows as well. So you look at the org chart here, and it kind of represents that now you’re starting to add additional layers of management, you’re starting to build out, you know, two of the three functional areas. So now you’ve got a more robust Operations Group, you’re starting to build out your sales and marketing team, you know, you still might have one or two people in the finance group when you’re at this size. And you’re looking at, you know, the size and scale, so will product manufacturer in that five to $10 million range, you know, diversified professional services firm, so maybe you’re doing it in accounting type work, you know, distributors in that 10 to $20 million range. So it kind of takes you up to just before that business planning section, kind of middle of the continuum resource. And what we found out there is that people that bring this to the table are in that hundred and 20 to 180 k base salary range plus bonds.

As we move further to the right.

Tony Bednar  

And as you can see, the charts again, become more complex, you know, this is where we’re saying you should really consider that full integrator at this point in time. So, again, you know, getting additional layers of management, much more difficult to keep people aligned. And on the same page, you’re looking at, you know, an established product manufacturer, and that $12 million plus range, established retailer and a $20 million plus So, like I said, when you when you when you’re bringing now the business planning, and this is companies that want to go from 20 million to 40 million, you know, and they’ve got kind of those growth aspirations. So, the level of person you need to be able to take somebody from 20 to 40 is much different than what you need to take somebody from 1 million to 2 million as an example. So this represents kind of that full integrator. You know, that can partner with the visionary and really take the business to the next level. Now, at this level, what we’re seeing from a salary compensation standpoint is 180 K to 225 K, you know, base salary plus bonus. And when you’re looking to bring in somebody at this level, it’s pretty common to have to offer them some kind of long term comp, long term setup as well. So it’s not equity, but it actually acts like equity, kind of a phantom equity type plan is very common. So what we’d like to do is kind of take you through an exercise and ask you to visualize your business and kind of where does it fit? Is it on the lower end of the continuum? Is it the middle end of the continuum? Is it at the upper end of the continuum or or is it somewhere in between, but just take a second and kind of absorb what we just went through and try and plot your business on this continuum.

John Fulwider  

Tony, while the guests are plodding. Mark asked the question, what title? Would you give an integrator for a company in the 20 to $25 million range? Looking to go to 50? And I think Marc’s talking about one if, if it’s a, if it’s a non EOS running company, what’s the equivalent title? And then also, what’s the business card title for an integrator, the external thing that we call the integrator, if we’re not going to call her or him?

Tony Bednar  

Yep. The most common title external titles for the integrator role are general manager, Chief Operating Officer or president. Yeah. So in that, in that example, you just described, you know, Chief Operating Officer might make the most sense, without having any more detail. But that’s what comes to mind first, in terms of an external title that you would use on a business card.

John Fulwider  

Yeah. And in the title Last couple of slides. Tony, I believe you’ve covered Joel’s question, which was how do you figure out how to compensate an integrator? What’s the average salary total compensation for an integrator? So I’m going to mark Joel, your question as answered. And then another thing I’d like to do is, Tony, at some point, go into just telling us what the what the performance bonus means.

Tony Bednar  

Sure, come into that. Awesome. So there are a few other considerations when you when you look at plotting, you know, where your business is at on that continuum that you that you want to consider, right. So in terms of what level integrator Do I need, so you got to look at your goals, your three year picture, your 10 year target, if you want to double the size of your company and go to you know, 10 to 20 million or 20 to 40 million. You know, you want to move here, you’re, you know, yourself to the right, and you kind of want to higher up you want to You want to bring in somebody that’s kind of been there and done that and proven that they can lead that larger organization and have had those experiences. The other thing to consider is, is your involvement. So if you’re a visionary, and you are still heavily involved in kind of the the business planning piece, the strategy and when you look at at the role clarity that you get through, you know, completing the accountability chart, and you still want to hold on to those accountabilities, then you’d want to hire somebody at the lower end to compliment you. Whereas if you want to exit the business in a much larger way, and that is involved, then you’d hire somebody at the higher end of the continuum. So make sure it aligns with what your personal goals are in terms of how involved you want to be in the business going forward. And then the third one is profit. You know, you need to be able to afford the roll. Some of those dollar amounts that we just quoted are significant and in some cases, this role It’s gonna be the most expensive person you’ve ever hired, right? So you got to look at what the business can afford. But we want to caution you to say, if you hire somebody at a lower level, and you have, you know, the desires to grow and things, one, it might inhibit that growth a little bit or slow it down until you’re going to be in a position where you might need to upgrade that integrator role in 1824 months as well. So that’s a position you want to make sure, you know, you’re focused on it, and it doesn’t become kind of a two step process for you to really get the right person in that in that integrator seat. So taking in those other considerations, and what we described earlier and trying to plot yourself on that continuum to really understand what level of integrator you need for your business. So we talked earlier, you know, what options do I have for filling the integrator seat in like, you know, it started out and this is where most you know, visionary owners start out Is that you fill up by default, you know, unless you bring in a partner or start your business with a partner, and one of you happens to be the visionary, the other one happens to be the integrator, you know, you’re it, whether you like it or not. And this can work. And this can work well, for businesses, you know, up until a certain point. And basically, it’s until you hit your ceiling, and you kind of maximize, you know, what you can really bring to that role and add to your business over time. And so this is where everybody starts. And that’s, that’s the trick is to say, you know, how much integrator do I have? in Me, personally, you know, how far can I take the business before I start being the one the bottleneck, and I’m the person that’s holding back from growing, but that’s where people start. Now, once you decide that you want to fill that integrator seat with somebody else, you’ve got a few different options. You know, this is what we do at Keystone. So in this option, you’re bringing in an integrator, but they’re also going to Fill one of your senior leadership team seats as well. And we call this a twofer. And it’s a, it’s a really common option for small and mid sized companies. So it’s a good way for you to get more value, I guess you could say where, you know, I came up with an accounting degree had a seat worked for a CPA firm I had my CPA license was it was a corporate controller, before I got into general management and other positions. So at Keystone, for me to feel that the Finance and Accounting Seed you know, it’s kind of you can spread my salary out over multiple positions, I guess, is what we’re saying. So that is an option that that works well. And it’s it’s very common, and it’s it’s for that integrator to fill another seat within the business, especially in the small to mid size, range. And ultimately, what you’re trying to get to is where you’ve got, you know, the ability to bring in somebody full time, but You can also look at bringing in an interim integrator. So that’s it’s kind of that that bridge, right? So it’s like I can’t afford full time, I might have some specific needs that I want addressed in the business. So in Mike’s example, he brought in Jerry, Rick as a fractional integrator. And Jerry was at the high end of the continuum, he had he had started and run three businesses, you know, very successful guy. And Mike needed some help in that business planning and that advisor, you know, part of the continuum so he brought in Jerry, it was it ended up being two days a week for a couple of years, but it was a means to an end. So once they got kind of the business structure set, and a really clear path and where they wanted to go, then it was time for Jerry to exit and for me to come into the business. So you know, we always encourage people to look at that fractional integrator interim, you know, integrator as a as a temporary thing. It’s a means to an end to get you to where you can actually fill that seat full Time and there are exceptions to that there are companies that have been using fractions or interims for much longer than that. But I think the right mindset is to think about bringing in that fractional kind of graduating, if you will, to where you can bring in that full time resource. But ultimately, it’s you want to get to that full time integrator. So, at some point at Keystone when we get large enough, and we’ve got the financial ability, and you know, we’ve got the leadership team and built out to the point where I can move into that integrator role full time, that’s a goal for ours. And it should be a goal for any company because that’s where having that that focus in terms of developing people in parting with the visionary to really grow the organization is what you want to do. So those are kind of some of the options. Those are the options that you can consider. And we’ll definitely dig into those more in the q&a

John Fulwider  

session. Let’s uh, let’s pause there for q&a because we have some fractional integrator related questions. interim and fractional. So I ask, asked two of them. One is can you talk to how to bring a fractional integrator into the mix? What about an integrator with another company spending part time on your company? And then the second question is, how do you figure it compensation out for the fractional integrator?

Tony Bednar  

So, I would answer that this way, the integrator continuum that we just, you know, went through an introduced you to applies to not only full time integrators, but also fractional integrators. So, you need to go through that same process of identifying what your needs are as a visionary and as a business for that integrator role. And then you need to do a search and find the fractional integrator that has those specific skill sets and experiences that you’re looking for. So, if you’re looking for somebody to come in and run your oil pens and you know, manage your people in your processing Your metrics one day a week, on the lower end of that continuum, you know, be really specific on what your expectations are for that integrator, what what you want them to do in your organization, there’s a group out there called the integrator group. It’s a run by Rick Wilson, I think is his name. And they’ve got a pretty solid model in terms of coming into organizations one day a week. And adding value, but but he’s one where he also provides some of those advisory services. So he helps with hiring and firing and making sure you get the right people in the right seats and things. So there’s a lot of different flavors of fractional integrators out there. A lot of people use the title, but there’s no consistency in what’s actually being delivered. So as a visionary, you need to be very clear in terms of what your expectations are. And like I said, Please use the integrator continuum to help you dial in on what exactly you need.

John Fulwider  

Yeah, and Tony, you’ve you’ve given us fantastic data. salary ranges for full time integrators along the three levels of the continuum. You have any idea on ballparks for fractional integrators. I imagine it’s a fraction of those figures that you provide, but you know, bigger house smaller fraction.

I can handle that one if you like. Don’t go ahead. Yeah. Yeah. So

I’ll just be just be really open with you in terms of how we how we did it. And I typically fraction, at least the fraction is out there that I know are our independent consultants. So I kind of think about it in sort of an hourly type of an arrangement, although when when when we had Jerry, we didn’t, we didn’t build it hourly, per se, we didn’t keep track of his hours, we build it over four days per week. But I but in terms of how much it would cost, I thought about it hourly. And so Jerry, for example, is you know, if he’s working full time for someone, he’d be a 225 or $250,000 guy. So if you break that got down to an hourly, hourly range, you’re talking about someone who’s $110 an hour or $115 an hour so and then as an independent consultant, of course they have, they don’t have benefits and things like that. So they typically are going to add, you know, another 15 to 20% on top of that, to cover those things. So I think if you’re looking for somebody at that top of the, you know, that top of the continuum to come in, like I brought Jerry and you’re probably looking at somewhere in that $125 an hour kind of range. You know, as you go back down the continuum, it that will get a little bit lower, of course, but that’s what you need to expect so, so if you’re doing that to two days a week, you know, it’s two to two and a half days a week would be about $125,000 a year.

John Fulwider  

Fantastic. Thanks for the context Mike.

Tony Bednar  

Any other practical questions and before we move on

John Fulwider  

Nope, no fractional questions. All right. We do have. We do have one question about the accountability chart and what the visionary and what the integrator does. And your insight that you provided about option to the senior leadership team and integrator is both in the integrator seat, and also in another seat on the senior leadership team. And so, David asked the question in that context, would sales typically fall under the visionary at the 1 million to $10 million dollar revenue range? And then would sales not typically be a good integrator background in most organizations? So, so David’s asking, you know, when we’re sharing seats, does the visionary usually own the sales seat? And then is sales a good background or not? For an integrator? Yeah,

so good, Mike.

It’s a great question. And I

don’t know that there’s a perfect silver bullet answer to this. But I would I would say that the, if you’re if you are a smaller company and you’re and you bring in an integrator at that lower end of the continuum, you it may make sense for you, as a visionary to continue to hold on to sales for a while. That may make sense, because you may not be bringing in an integrator that has the capability of leading all functions in the business. But I think that’s something you want to keep fairly temporary. That’s not that’s not the ideal scenario. You know, you really want to ultimately get that integrator to handle all functions in the business as quickly as you can. As far as the question on, you know, as an integrator, as a sales background, good for an integrator, I would say, if you look at it by the numbers, it’s not typically the sales types that are going to be the best. That doesn’t mean that they can’t be We’ve seen some some good sales oriented integrators. But I would say more often as someone who grew up in their career and in either finance or operations. And if you think about it, that’s just as they come up through their career, the kinds of personalities that they have the detail orientation and so forth. There’s just more people on the finance and operations that that would have that perspective than then the sales types.

John Fulwider  

Yeah. So one last question, so that we have everybody’s question answered, and then guests, please type your questions into the q&a. Dan, zeroes in on the visionary and he asks, How does one identify the exact needs of the visionary write down all the things we don’t like doing? So So Dan, I would partially answer that by saying, refer to the first few chapters of rocket fuel when you read that book, or listen to You are really going to discover a perfect picture of the visionary business owner, and what she or he is good at and likes to do, and things that she or he is bad at and hates to do. So that’ll be a good starting point. Mike and, Tony, when you are working with visionaries in search of integrators, what do you see as the common pattern in things that they want to give up so that they can work in their unique ability?

Tony Bednar  

Well, I can I can take that one Mike. And one of the other tools that I would recommend using is the delegate elevate tool. And this is something that I highly recommend the visionaries complete when we’re working with them on an integrator search when we’re working on kind of that 90 day onboarding plan, because it can identify some quick quick hit things that the integrator can focus on early on that can really provide Immediate, you know, relief if you will add value to the visionary so you know that the going through the book and kind of getting the big picture of you and then taking a look at your own specific situation and your day to day activities and trying to see what you’re, you know what’s on your plate in your Carnival to do but you don’t really like to do it, you’re not very good at it, you know, those are the kind of low hanging fruit type things you can transition over into that role. Um, Mike, you want to

John Fulwider  

go ahead, let me let me address the delegate and elevate tool donate because that was a great tip for for the guests. Delegate and elevate tool is a tool in the EOS toolbox. So, for those of you who are working with a trained EOS implementer just grab your leadership team manual and turn to the toolbox section and grab that tool. If you don’t have it handy, ask your EOS implementer and she or he will be glad to send you a copy. If you’re not working with an EOS implementer I’ll send you a copy. Here’s what the delegated Have a tool is it simply asks you to, you know, for a week or so, or as little as a day, you know, kind of just write down what you do during the day and then sit and think with a cup of coffee or a frosty beverage as your preferences, and the time of day dictate. And just kind of categorize those things that you do as the visionary as the business owner on a day to day basis, and put them in one of four quadrants right. Hate to do bad at like to do bad at like to do good at and love to do great at and what we want to do is we want to move you into what Dan Sullivan with Strategic Coach calls your unique ability. Have you as the visionary doing only that handful of one, two, or maybe three things that God or the universe depending on your preference. Put you on This earth to excel at and delegate everything else. And so the reason the tool is called delegate and elevate is when you delegate, you elevate two people, one, you elevate yourself to your highest and best use, right? You you create the best value for your company, your employees, your customers and your family, right? And you also elevate the person to whom you delegate a responsibility. Because think about it, you’re taking an owner level job, right? This is something that is like the highest of the high level jobs, right? And you’re saying, I see potential in you. So I’m going to elevate you by giving you this responsibility and allowing you to run with it.

Tony Bednar  

All right, john, do we answer all those questions? Are we ready to go?

John Fulwider  

We did. Yeah. There’s a couple of more questions that have kicked out. But we’ll grab them a little later.

Tony Bednar  

Perfect. Well I want to do is turn it back over to Mike and talk about kind of what we’ve seen over the years. And it’s common mistakes that come up again and again and again. and have him speak to a few of those.

Sure.

So some of the things that we see fairly frequently the first one in terms of hiring an integrator mistakes around hiring an integrator, so not hiring the integrator at the right level. And this is really what is, you know, pushed us to put together that continuum to help visionaries really understand what is the right level for the business today and for myself as a visionary, and you know, more often will probably see it on the too low in the too low category where you don’t hire somebody who’s strategic enough who can handle things at the top closer to the top end of the continuum. And that visionary then gets very frustrated because they don’t really have that. partner. You know, john talked to the beginning about this, this unicorn This magical person in rocket fuel. And I think people read rocket fuel the visionaries read rocket fuel and think they bring in this person all that’s going to change and it’s going to be just, you know, Nirvana going forward. And and then when they hire someone, they don’t hire someone at the high end high enough up to scale, and then they’re disappointed. And then they start to think, oh, boy, this whole thing doesn’t work and sort of throw the whole the whole idea out. And so that’s a mistake that we see we do see sometimes where the higher too high where, for whatever reason, they’re convinced that they should get somebody at the top end of the spectrum, and they pay a lot of money for it. And the business wasn’t really ready for it, they really didn’t need help yet, with the business planning piece are really, you know, could still handle that piece for themselves. And they’ve spent a lot of money and set themselves back from a profitability standpoint really damaged the business. The other thing we see, of course, is in interest in the interviewing process in the recruiting process. It’s really important that when you’re going out to find an integrator that you have, first of all, That’s strong profile of what you’re looking for, because it’s impossible to interview and recruit somebody if you don’t know exactly what you’re looking for, but then not following a thorough process, you know, really looking at multiple candidates out there making sure you’re asking all the candidates the same questions and that you’re moving through a process in a timely fashion because good people out there aren’t going to wait too long. And, and one of the great things that we found as recruiters with EOS companies is that good outside candidates love EOS companies because they can come in there you know, they’re normally can be very skittish about joining a privately held company or a founder led company. And but when they CEOs and they see how things are working, and they know that you’re working according to that plan, it gives them a lot more comfort that, you know, they’re not joining some crazy entrepreneur who they don’t know what’s going to happen day to day. So same thing with the interviewing process need to have a thoughtful, thorough and billing process, make sure you go through that and keep it timely so that your, as you see those good candidates, you’re moving them through and get into that ultimate great fit. And then lastly, the onboarding piece, you know, after you go through a recruiting process, it can be kind of tiring, and then you get that person on board and you go, huh, I’m finished. It’s great. Now we can have Nirvana. But you got to remember that that those first few months especially are really critical that you get off on the right foot, your same page meetings, that you’re really building a trust level personally with this with this new integrator, because it’s really that relationship that’s going to make things go. And so being really thoughtful on those early days about making sure that that’s happening, making sure they’re getting introduced to the organization properly and and can get up to speed quickly is really important.

Tony Bednar  

You know, one of the things I’ll add to that like is when we a lot of conversations I have with visionary owners, you know, talking about the integrator search as they asked you know, how important is it for this integrator to have worked, you know, within the EOS system, you know, in already know the tools? and and you know, the answer we always give is we don’t make that a requirement when we’re out there looking for the right people with the right background and the skill set. Because that limits the pool in a very large way. And you’re going to miss some really quality candidates. So we look for people with the right background experience. We don’t worry about their experience with us when we find the right people, they learn the tools very quickly, they embrace them. You know, they’ve been doing 85% of it intuitively, in their careers. Now things have a name and it’s got a structure. So if you’re out there, you know, doing a search do not just focus on people that that say they’re an integrator today, because you’re going to be missing a lot of quality people. And just because people say they’re an integrator, and they have it on the resume and they use that title, doesn’t mean they’re good at it. Right. That’s the other caution I would throw out

John Fulwider  

Tony, what about insisting on expertise in my industry, right? I need somebody who’s been in manufacturing or I need someone who’s been in construction.

Tony Bednar  

You know, in large part, the integrator, a true integrator, and their abilities are industry agnostic. Now, when we do searches, you know, it’s preferred to pull somebody with industry experience. And so we typically start our searches there. And then we’ll look at adjacent industries and but we also kind of take that best athlete approach. So we look at, you know, somebody that just has that really strong integrator profile, and we will pull them into the mix as well. So it’s not a requirement.

I would just add to that, at this level, you know, you’re talking about people who are pretty intelligent out there. And so, you know, learning an industry is something that most people at this level are capable of fairly quickly. What you can’t train though, is the core values fit and the culture fit and that’s a really key part of This as well. So, you know, when it comes right down to it, would we rather have somebody who has come in out of the industry or somebody who fits the core values? It’s hands down the core value side of the equation. And, and in that relationship with the with the owner.

John Fulwider  

All right. Speaking of visionaries, I’ve got a three questions that have to do with a Hey, there’s the q&a slide. Excellent timing. All right, so. So Tony asks, If one is currently Wait, sorry, Tony, your question was not the first one. David. All right. David asks, How do you identify slash convince a founder, that is an integrator that he needs to find a visionary?

Tony Bednar  

Mike, I’ll let you take that one.

So make sure I understood that question properly. The the owner is the integrator.

John Fulwider  

Yeah, I think they did. David means to say that the owner has more integrator types as more

Mike Frommelt  

integrators envision

John Fulwider  

that it needs to find it.

So how do you how do you convince I, my cynical answer would be delicately but I really real answer would be, you know, I think the I think the best way to do that is really again, taking take going back and, and taking a look at rocket fuel and looking at roles. And they do a great job in there of, you know, again of what that visionary is and does and what the integrator is and does. And really going through with those things one at one at a time and saying that, you know, is this really what you want to be doing? And this is this, what you’re really good at, and, and just being having open and honest conversations around that. And the great thing about being an owner is you can play what role you want to play we’ve worked with, we’ve worked with companies that have just set up an owner’s box, you know, one particular owner I worked with he was a technical company, he just kind of like tinkering with the technology. So we put them in the owners box. And he just got to do kind of what he wanted to do what made him happy day to day. And he hired have, you know, he hired a CEO and an integrator. And so there’s no shame in you know, saying, Hey, I’m not, I’m not the best fit for the visionary seat. And let’s, you know, I’ll sit in the integrator seat, and let’s bring in some, you know, some visionary skills. You know, you have to kind of get beyond the, you know, the pride part of it and say, Hey, where do we want to take this company, and what’s going to be most successful? And at the end of the day, if you’re the owner, you’re the ones gonna benefit from that. So I know it’s a delicate conversation. But I think going back they say going back to rocket fuel and kind of really going through those roles. The other thing I would say there, though, too, is that the visionary, I’m not positive that you would go out and hire a visionary, if you can, can you know if that owner says, Hey, I truly am an integrator. I’m not sure that you would go and hire a visionary and put them solely in that seat, I think it would might be more appropriate to make sure you’re bringing some visionary skills into some of the other roles of the organization. The visionary, title and seat is really pretty set aside for an owner that already has that kind of a background. And, john, maybe you can add to that, but I think in you know, EOS, I’m not sure that you would recommend that you go fill that seat with a pure visionary. Maybe you would bring in a visionary, someone who has some more visionary skills in your VP of Sales role or another role in the organization that would help to bring some of those things in.

John Fulwider  

Right yeah, Mike, I think that would be one way to do it. Use the use the visionary and integrator assessment found in rocket fuel and also found on Mark winters website at rocket fuel now.com. There is an electronic version of the assessment so I would if that were the case, you know, have each of your leadership team members take that and find where we have some some visionary characteristics. Another thing you can do is that you can simply engage an informal or formal board of advisors or board of directors who if you are lacking some strategic thinking capacity, and some original thinking to grow and develop your business in response to our constantly changing economic conditions, right? You can get that advice, counsel and mentorship from outside your company. Heck, you can even do it by calling up my friend Janet Walker, who is a Vistage chair and he’s actually on the call today and join a Vistage group which is a peer group of business owners where you are able to enhance your thinking, enhance your decision making by getting perspective from non competing business owners in a wide variety of industries. So that would be yet another way to bite at that Apple. Let’s, let’s switch to the other side of the visionary integrator skills split right. Anonymous attendee asks one, if a visionary has some integrator skills, how would you recommend they go about considering whether to hire an integrator or an assistant?

Tony Bednar  

Okay, well, I can take that one. And it just depends on again, going back to your accountability chart. Because what you’re saying is I want to, I want to continue to sit in that integrator seat. I’m the visionary I’ve got some integrator skills I’m going to consider I’m going to keep myself in that seat. I’m going to take accountability To be the best integrator I can be for this organization. And I need some help. So I’m going to hire an assistant to take away some of the, you know, more basic tasks that that are consuming my day. So it kind of goes back to the delegate and elevate what’s the best use of your time. Right? is where I would go with that. So

John Fulwider  

I love this question, Tony. So I’m gonna, I’m gonna jump in. I love any business owner, indeed, any senior leadership team member, if you have the slightest inkling to hire an assistant, do it, do it, do it. Anything you’re doing that you can pay somebody else $10 an hour to do pay on anything you’re doing. You could pay somebody else $20 an hour to do. Hiram, anything else you could pay somebody $30 an hour to do do it. As you might imagine there’s an iOS tool for this. It’s in your toolbox. It’s called the assistance track. And it gives you just five bullet points on the amazing return of time that you can get by getting yourself out of the low level tasks. And let me talk about low or level tasks. Right? It’s a it’s a miss, it’s a misnomer, right? Because they’re, they’re critically important, and they’re not the highest best use of your time. And they also de energize you right? they rob you of your energy and your passion, because you don’t like to do them and you’re not good at them. The thing is, the wonders of human diversity are that for every task you don’t like to do and are bad out. There somebody who loves to do it and is great at it. And you just need to create the opening for them to take that task, excel at it, honestly do a much better job at it than you did, right? And that is going to free you as the visionary up to, in this instance, be a great Integrator for the company and probably frees you up to sell more as well. All right, so trying to grab the next question to make sure we get these in order just a second here. Tony asks if one is currently performing as a high level integrator, briefly, what is the process to become certified?

Tony Bednar  

Well, currently, I am not aware of an actual certification that you can go out and get for integrators. There is Marcus, the winner puts on a course, integrator Academy master class. So that’s something that you can you can go out and do, which I would recommend I went through that myself. It’s worthwhile, you can build a network, you you go through the course with a cohort. So you’re tied into that cohort community forever. But then once you graduate, you also are included into a Facebook group of anybody that’s ever graduated from that class. You get exposure to a much larger group of integrators as well. But in terms of an actual integrator certification out there, there is not one

John Fulwider  

that that’s right Tony and I, I believe in recent months after you took the integrator Academy masterclass, Mark is Mark is upgrading that, right he’s, he’s adding new online learning modules adding in person components, right. And so, let’s go back to the idea of a peer group, Tony, who asked the question I mean, one of the best ways that you can get better, right is just to find fellow integrators to to work with and and bounce ideas and questions and issues off of them. Right? You’re already familiar with with IDs, identify, discuss solve. And the reality is that being the integrator, it’s, it’s lonely at the top right. There’s not a whole lot of people that you can talk to openly and honestly to get perspective on, you know, some tough issue, man is it is it just me is my visionary, the only, you know, crazy, wild eyed person who, you know, has 100 ideas and wants to pursue them simultaneously, right. One great resource. Andrea, thank you so much for reminding me of this. For women integrators, there is the female integrator mastermind and they have gone to the point where they Have quarterly pulsing sessions for integrators much like EOS implementers do where we get together quarterly to sharpen the saw and improve our our knowledge and ability. The female integrator mastermind also provides that to that resource. Next up is anonymous attendee has another question. Have you ever seen a visionary and or integrator run two different businesses containing 40 to 50 full time employees and each company can this work

Tony Bednar  

make you want to take down

I have seen a few scenarios like that and I think it can work you know, I’m I’m just thinking you know, kind of the individuals that I know that are in that situation and and yes, it can work. But your course you’re looking for, you know that the level of complexity there is, is is high. So you are going to be looking for someone that’s on the on the upper and probably all the way to the upper end of the of the continuum in that in that integrator seat. And you really have to have that visionary and integrator as true business partners to run something with that, that level of complexity. But yes, it it can work. The other thing I have seen is a single visionary who has two or three companies and has integrators in each of those companies.

Tony Bednar  

In any of those scenarios, I think it’s a being able to have open and honest conversations. At what point Have you reached your capacity? And are you holding the company back? Or are you holding the company back? I’ll use EOS worldwide as an example. You know, the original, you know, the author of traction and the inventor of EOS is, you know, Whitman and, you know, he started the business side of this and he went out and found out tinea says integrator, you know, they, you know had a plan and they executed their plan and they knew they were going to get to the business to a certain level and then that was going to outgrow them and their their desire and their abilities. And so they were very thoughtful in terms of I’m going to take the business to this level, and then I’m going to bring in a new visionary and I’m gonna bring in a new integrator. So from a business planning perspective, you know, that makes a lot of sense. And that’s not always on an owner visionaries radar that they should be doing that and thinking about when is my business going to outgrow me as a person? When should I transition to that ownership box and bring in somebody else to take my company to that next level? So that comes into play here as well and just being open and honest with yourself in terms of how much can you really do and at what point are you holding the business and everybody else back?

John Fulwider  

Yeah, abs absolutely Tony to build on that a key phrase to remember friends. The bottleneck is always at the top You need to be open and honest with yourself as as Tony said, you know, can you really give both businesses? Enough of you? Right? In order for the business to grow because the business growth is not only about meeting your your, your personal objectives and your profit and wealth goals? It’s also it’s it’s opportunities for everybody on your senior leadership team. Is there enough profit potential? Is there enough growth potential for them to grow in their careers? Right? Is there enough opportunity for people at the line level to move up in the company so the bottleneck is always always at the top? Consider when it might be time to step into the owners box with one of those businesses and hire a visionary and an integrator to lead that particular company to the Next stage of growth. Carrie has a question about integrators. He writes, knowing the integrator will be performing some needed cleanup, how much do you share during the interview process, not wanting to turn them off, but wanting them to be aware of the issues already identified.

I was that the in my experience in recruiting as long as I have good executives are not afraid of challenges. They just need to know what those challenges are. And when people get frustrated, executives get frustrated is when they’re brought in. And and the challenges are much deeper than were described or different than what were described. So I would, I would encourage you to be open and honest about what needs to be cleaned up. Because I think that helps you to get a better, a better fit. Because again, the way that it did that senior level people look at job opportunities they say is is what I can bring to this organization going to be helpful and move the needle. And so if you’re open and honest about what the issues are, and they feel that that fits with what how they can help you move the needle, then it’s going to be a great fit.

Tony Bednar  

I’m open and honest all the way. You know, when you especially when you’re hired, you want to you want to hit on your core values hard, you want to make sure that they understand what they’re walking into. You know, you want to scare some people away, that aren’t going to be a good fit. They don’t have the experiences and don’t feel like they can be successful in the role. So if you’re not being open and honest, you’re doing yourself a disservice. And you’re likely more likely to put somebody in that seat that isn’t qualified.

John Fulwider  

Yeah, and I would say two things. One, a third vote for open and honest, the expectation in our EOS Sessions is always open and honest. So that’s the that’s the basic expectation we have anytime Senior lead and senior leadership team comes together to solve issues such as the ones that have built up prior to hiring the integrator. So always open and honest. The other thing I would say is that a seasoned professional, someone who has been there and done that before, has seen the underbelly of other businesses, right. And everybody on this call who works in a business, if you’re being honest with yourself, you admit that every business has a lot of problems, right? There’s always issues to be solved, there’s always improvements to be made. And so that type of engaged, passionate, experienced professional, you want to hire as your integrator, she or he knows that there’s going to be some challenges and, and, and, and if I were coming in as your integrator, I want to be thinking about those challenges right from the start. Before I’m even in the seat, so I would want to know in advance. All right, we, we have run out of questions, guests, use the q&a function to type any more questions that you have any more questions team. Remember also, as you’re thinking about your final questions that if you’d like to learn a little bit more about EOS, just five minutes or so extra, stick around after we say goodbye to Tony and Mike. And I’ll give you a quick high level to or of the EOS model to help you decide, hey, would this be a good fit for growing my business? All right. Let’s see. Scott says this has been great. Thank you guys. Yep. Thank you, Scott. Thanks so much for being here. All right. Well, if there are no more questions, remember that look for an email from Mike and Tony, they are going to send you that ebook how to hire the right Integrator for you, which goes into a deeper dive than we did on the call today about how to do the methods and mechanics of the actual integrator search. So that’ll be a valuable resource. Tony, Mike, any closing comments or words of inspiration you’d like to share with us?

Tony Bednar  

I’ll just add that. If anybody wants to talk about the integrator continuum, or learn more about Keystone, you know, reach out to Mike directly. We have our phone numbers and emails, you know, on the website, as well. As far as you know, in regards to our contact information, we’re happy to set up a free 30 minute consultation call. We’re here to help you on your journey. Everybody’s on a journey. Everybody’s at a different time. Different plays. So anything we can do to, to provide value are willing, willing to take the time to do that. So please feel free to take advantage of that.

John Fulwider  

Fantastic Tony and Mike, thank you so much for bringing data context and experience to the question of integrators. Before this call. They sounded like a unicorn from a magical forest after this call. It sounds like a professional I really can find and hire to take my business to the next level. So I know everyone on the call is as grateful as I am. Thank you, everybody. We’re still in quarantine mode and it feels great. Do this with me, even though they can’t hear you. Let’s clap audibly for my can Tony. Mike and Tony, thank you. So thank you to Kevin can hang up if you need to move on to other business and I am I’m going to do the promised quick overview of Eos.

Tony Bednar  

Alright. Thanks, everybody.

John Fulwider  

Thanks, everyone. Absolutely, thanks. Okay, so for those of you on the call, who are still interested in learning a little bit more about EOS, just once one or two sentence overview. EOS is a complete and proven system with a set of simple practical tools designed to get you everything that you want from your business. And what we do to get you what you want from your business is we strengthen six key components of your business. So I’m just going to describe what your company looks like and feels like at the end of the journey that I take with each of my clients. So we strengthen the vision component, what that means is getting everybody in your company, all on the same page with where you’re going and how you plan to get there. Not only that, but everybody knows their role in a complicating the vision and they want to accomplish it for you. we strengthen the people component, which means to find in great people uniquely for your company, getting the right people in the right seats, and creating such a compelling culture that you end up attracting the right people and repelling the wrong people. Most businesses have a hard time attracting and retaining great talent. This makes it much simpler and easier. Data component is all about running your company on good hard solid facts and figures, rather than the guesses egos and assumptions that rule the day at so many entrepreneurial companies, giving the owners and the senior leaders such an absolute pulse on the health of the business that you’re able to wait for it. take a vacation, because you see patterns and trends and you can predict from the number That you’re able to stay away for another day or even another week, when you’ve strengthened vision people and data if you can imagine that your company becomes much more open, honest, lucid and transparent to the point where issues things holding us back opportunities, we want to pursue points of frustration, man, we just get really good about talking about them out in the open and solving them as they arise. We we set them up, we knock them down and we make them go away forever, rather than doing what most business leaders do as they’re moving fast, which is they wrap up their issues in duct tape and baling wire, stick them in the corner. Hope they don’t explode. And by the way, they always do. we strengthen the process component which means getting your secret sauce, your unique way of adding value, simplified, documented and followed by all what that does is it gives us pretty detectability profitability, ultimately scalability to any size that we desire. And then finally we strengthen the traction component, which is all about bringing that vision down to the ground and executing on it week in and week out with discipline and real accountability. It’s no mistake, France that the EOS model looks like a wheel with vision at the top and traction at the bottom. Because what we like to say is that vision without traction is hallucination. What happens when people are not getting what they want from their businesses? They’re working 70 hours a week already, and they’re frustrated, they’ve hit the ceiling and they think, you know, it must just be me. I must not be working hard enough. So they press harder on the gas pedal and work 80 hours a week, but they don’t have traction. And so what they do is they spin their wheels, throw up a bunch of mud frustrate themselves and others that’s not what I want for business owners taking incredible risks, to create value for their customers for their employees, their family, their community. So that’s why I’m glad people stick around and hear a little bit of overview of how we can get traction using Eos. For more on that mark your calendar for July 24, where I’ll do a deep dive on EOS and strengthening the six key components. Answer your specific questions that’s coming up July 24 at 8am look for the registration link in your focus Friday email, which will be coming to you next Friday. And then also mark your calendars please for improvise your business with my friend Gina trimarco. She’s going to teach us how to use improv skills to improve our business communication, improve our selling. with that. I am john Full lighter. This has been your focus Friday webinar. If you have any questions need any help or encouragement growing your business, please give me a call. I’m here to help. Andrea, David, john, Kevin, Tony, you stayed till the very end. I’m so grateful you were here with me this morning. Go forth, stay focused. Have a great day and a great weekend.

Bye now.